Micro CPH is a 2-day single track conference taking place in Copenhagen on May 14-15. Join us for inspiring talks about microservices, distributed and event-driven architecture, and get insights into the operational side of developing, running, deploying and testing microservices.

Buy tickets
image description image description image description

speakers

Susanne Kaiser

Independent Tech Consultant

James Lewis

Thoughtworks

Indu Alagarsamy

Particular Software

Nick Tune

Navico

Sneha Inguva

Digital Ocean

Nic Jackson

Hashicorp

Michael Geers

micro-frontends.org

Jessica Tai

AirBnB

Dennis Doomen

Aviva Solutions

Mikkel Mørk Hegnhøj

Microsoft

Thomas Bøgh Fangel

Lunar Way

Emil Krog Ingerslev

Lunar Way

Chris Richardson

microservices.io

Jeppe Cramon

Cloud Create

Shahid Iqbal

Independent consultant

Christian Mikkelsen

Telenor

SusanneKaiser

Independent Tech Consultant

As the CTO at Just Software, Susanne is responsible for the software development of JUST SOCIAL - providing apps for collaboration and communication in organizations. She has a background in computer sciences and experience in software development for more than 15 years.

Lightning talk: Preparing For a Future Microservices Journey

Session

Video - Slides

In the light of rapidly changing market requirements organizations must accelerate to excel in the market. A 4-years research (by Nicole Forsgren, Jez Humble and Gene Kim) has revealed that software delivery performance has a strong impact on profitability, productivity and market share of technology organizations. Loosely coupled architecture, such as promoted by microservices, and empowered teams are some of the capabilities to improve software delivery performance. After having already introduced microservices in a startup context I would like to share some thoughts what to do differently when introducing microservices next time in the future.

JamesLewis

Thoughtworks

James has been working at ThoughtWorks for nearly a decade. He joined back in 2005 as a developer. He had about 8 years experience prior to that point but still remembers feeling like an imposter for the entire first year. Since then, he has learnt more than he ever thought possible about how to build software from some of the most genuine, enthusiastic people he has met.

These days James is primarily interested in building distributed systems using web technologies. He has been a keen observer (and participant) in the resurgence of interest in SOA and can often be found being a loud mouth at conferences, usually on some aspect of building microservices. He has also been known to give his opinions on lean software engineering, domain driven design, organisational design and innovation. 

Oh, and Welsh rugby.

Keynote: Flow, Microservices and scale

Keynote

Video

Recent research summarised in the book Accelerate points to a set of practices that lead to high software development organisation performance. Simultaneously, research from the Santa Fe institute on Complex Adaptive Systems over the last 20 years seems to point to a grand unified theory of organisational design. So have we cracked it? Do we now have the answer to the question: how do we create and scale high performing software and organisations? In his keynote, James explores this research and takes a look at the surprising links between microservices, elephants, Copenhagen and companies.

InduAlagarsamy

Particular Software

Programmer...Single mom...Passionate about life, distributed computing, SOA, messaging and rock climbing! Currently dev at @particularsw

Indu Alagarsamy has been programming for over 15 years. She is currently part of the development team at Particular Software, the makers of NServiceBus, practicing her passion. Indu is also passionate about diversity and inclusiveness in the tech industry. When not programming, she is either rock climbing in sunny Southern California or spending time with her kids and her ginormous chill dog!

Autonomy & Asynchrony: The key to designing reliable systems

Session

Video - Slides

Autonomy and Asynchrony are two of the most important concepts for building reliable software systems. The real world operates on events but when we write software, we tend to use a call stack style of Command and Control. Understanding asynchrony can help you spot things like temporal coupling and other road blocks that prevent you from being autonomous.

In this session, see how event-driven architecture can power your systems and help you think about autonomy from the get go. Understand the gotchas of what's involved when you delve into the land of messaging and events. Build your services as small units that can scale, be autonomous and give you reliability, all the hallmarks of a good microservice.

NickTune

Navico

Nick is a strategic technical leader at Navico. He has a passion for delighting users, creating business impacts, crafting quality software, and building world-class engineering teams. He is the co-author of two books: Patterns, Principles and Practices of Domain-Driven Design (Wrox) and Designing Autonomous Teams and Services (O'Reilly), and frequently blogs about technical leadership at ntcoding.co.uk.

Strategic Microservice Patterns

Session

Video - Slides

Everybody knows there are hundreds of technical patterns you can apply to microservices. Yet nobody knows about the hundreds of domain patterns you can apply to microservices. By aligning your microservices with your business domain, you create a software system which is easier to comprehend, easier to evolve, and easier to develop at speed because it reflects the business. Understanding domain patterns helps you align your microservices and your business domain.

Learn why it’s important not to confuse The Entity Lifecycle Pipeline and The Proposal Pipeline. Learn how to manage complexity, and politics, when your domain contains an Octopus Context. And learn about many other domain patterns including The Dogfood Context, The Engagement Context, and The Brain Context.

To create the best architecture you also need to understand the business model. By viewing your microservices as business capabilities aligned to domain patterns, you will be able to design the best architecture for your business and for the teams building your microservices.

SnehaInguva

Digital Ocean

Sneha Inguva is a software engineer on the networking team at DigitalOcean. She has previously worked on the internal tooling team, inspiring passion to investigate observability primitives for new products. In her spare time, she frequents international cat cafes and medium to tall-sized mountains.

Observability and Product Release: Building, Testing, and Shipping Networking Features at DigitalOcean

Session

Video - Slides

Monoliths to microservices, containerization, blackbox to whitebox monitoring. DigitalOcean has experienced a shift in how services are built and deployed in the last few years, and along with that has come an even more important need to leverage the pillars of observability. Though the focus is often on services already in production, within this talk, I will focus on nascent services. Namely, how can we leverage metrics, tracing, and logging to test, improve, and deploy new microservices?

Listeners will hear about specific cases of networking services rigorously tested and tuned via learnings from observability primitives. We will showcase instrumentation, key visualizations, and takeaways from our testing. Listeners will be able to hear about areas for improvement and find out how to use these learnings for their own releases.

NicJackson

Hashicorp

Nic Jackson is a developer advocate at HashiCorp and the author of “Building Microservices in Go” a book which examines the best patterns and practices for building microservices with the Go programming language. Additionally, Nic is writing “Vault in Action” with his co-author Anubhav Mishra, a book which discusses operational and application security using the popular open source HashiCorp Vault, due to be published summer 2019

Has the service mesh killed the fat network client?

Session

Video - Slides

Microservice design is deliberately loosely coupled and decentralized, while you gain the benefit of high availability.  One problem is that we need to implement particular network reliability patterns like Load Balancing, Circuit Breaking, Retries, and Timeouts, often as a “fat” network client in each service.

In this talk, we will take a look in depth at these network reliability patterns and the benefits they give our systems. We will also see how we can leverage the power of the service mesh with Envoy and Consul Connect to implement them without the need for shared libraries and code changes.

MichaelGeers

micro-frontends.org

Michael Geers is a developer and builds e-commerce systems at neuland Büro für Informatik in Germany. He thinks of himself as a full stack developer, but the largest part of his work is centered around frontend development and architecture for building and maintaining solid user interfaces. Over the last years he worked on several vertically sliced development projects. At micro-frontends.org he shares his experiences on integrating UIs, built by different teams, in the browser.

He likes template languages, building design systems and optimizing web performance. In his free time he create small hardware projects with his kids. On Twitter you can find him as @naltatis.

Micro Frontends - The Nitty Gritty Details or Frontend, Backend, 🌈 Happyend

Session

Video - Slides

The term Micro Frontends describes the idea of splitting your application into vertical slices, which are developed by autonomous cross functional teams. So beside caring about database and business logic, each team also develops their own part of the user interface. This talk will describe different strategies to integrate these user interfaces in the browser without locking them into a single shared frontend framework like React, Angular or Vue.js. When doing this, you also need to keep an eye on web performance and you should have a plan on how to ensure that the customer gets a consistent look and feel.

Furthermore there are a lot of benefits to a cross functional team compared to separate dedicated frontend and backend teams. It removes friction, enables you to iterate more quickly, reduces the need for formal documentation and helps you find better technical solutions.

Key takeaways:

  • Understand the ideas behind micro frontends and the benefits and drawbacks of this approach
  • Pick an appropriate frontend integration strategy
  • Learn what web components are and how they can help in providing an neutral interface
  • Identify topics where it is important to decide between team autonomy and uniformity
  • Have a broad overview of related topics like performance monitoring and design systems that need to be addressed
  • Understand the organizational benefits and challenges that come with this model

JessicaTai

AirBnB

Jessica has worked at Airbnb for 5 years, starting as a full-stack engineer for the guest and host products and is now an infrastructure engineer on the Core Services team. She leads the user service, which integrates with all business verticals as one of Airbnb’s highest trafficked services. In addition to driving best practices for service development, she focuses on Leadership & Development as the Vice President of the Airbnb women in tech community. Prior to Airbnb, Jessica received her Masters of Computer Science at Stanford and her Bachelors degree from UCLA.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/jessicamtai
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jessicatai/

Airbnb’s Great Migration: Building Services at Scale

Session

Video - Slides

So you’ve decided to migrate from monolith to microservices, what next? Such a redesign to service-oriented architecture (SOA) is a long, arduous journey that benefits from an incremental, iterative approach. Yet, such a migration often must be done while still shipping new features, accelerating developer velocity, and growing the team in addition to ensuring there are no performance regressions.
 
This talk will focus on how Airbnb is building, operating, and scaling its expanding network of services. Though our re-architecture to SOA is still ongoing, we are already seeing various benefits including improved performance, developer productivity, build and deploy times, and site reliability.
 
Key takeaways: 

  • Understand design principles for building scalable, performant services
  • Plan for dependencies: how to sequence decomposition into services and an API gateway
  • Learn best practices for standardization, reliability, and performance when migrating architecture
  • Identify ways to shift product culture to empower migration work
  • Recognize tradeoffs with operating microservices

DennisDoomen

Aviva Solutions

Dennis is an agile .NET architect with a broad interest in modern software development, Domain Driven Design, CQRS, Event Sourcing and everything agile. He specializes in designing enterprise solutions based on the .NET technologies as well as providing coaching on all aspects of designing, building and maintaining enterprise systems. He is the author of www.fluentassertions.com, an assertion framework for fluently asserting the outcome of unit tests and he has been publishing coding guidelines for C# 3.0, C# 4.0 and C# 5.0 on www.csharpcodingguidelines.com since 2001. He also maintains a blog on his everlasting quest for better solutions at www.continuousimprover.com. You can reach him on Twitter through @ddoomen.

An Event Sourcing Retrospective - The Good, The Bad and the Ugly

Session

Video - Slides

In 2009, I first learned about Event Sourcing and Command Query Responsibility Segregation (CQRS) at a training Greg Young gave in Utrecht, The Netherlands. I remembered to be awed by the scalability and architectural simplicity those styles provided. However, I also remembered the technical complexity that comes with it. In 2012, I was in charge of transitioning a CQRS-based system to Event Sourcing. I knew it would be non-trivial, but boy was I in for a surprise.

So over the last four years I've experienced first-hand how a large group of developers had to deal with the transition. It's a brilliant solution for high-performance or complex business systems, but you need to be aware that this also introduces challenges most people don't tell you about. In this talk, I'd like to share you some of the most powerful benefits of ES, but also show you the flipside of the coin and cover some of the smaller and bigger challenges you'll run into it. Again, I love it and would apply it again without any doubt, but I really want you to understand the trade-offs before you jump on the Event Sourcing train.

MikkelMørk Hegnhøj

Microsoft

Mikkel works as a Program Manager within Azure Compute at Microsoft

Has spent his entire professional career working with Microsoft technologies. Has for the last three years been part of different product teams inside Microsoft, focusing on Azure.
Working in the Azure Service Fabric team, providing Service Fabric and Azure Service Fabric Mesh. Main areas of responsibilities are .NET, developer experiences and Windows containers.

This is how Microsoft runs Microservices that powers Microsoft's cloud Azure

Session

Video

Microsoft runs one of the World larges public clouds. Come listen to an in-depth talk about how Microsoft is building the cloud and the services it offers on top of open source software.

We will discuss the design principles and capabilities needed to build planet scale systems, and how distributed systems design can benefit systems with less scaling requirements - and when they are not a good fit.

You will also be able to see demos of the technologies we use.

Thomas Bøgh Fangel

Lunar Way

Architect and Backend Engineer at Lunar Way

Thomas is a backend architect and developer at Lunar Way - one of the new players in the nordic banking sector. His time is equally divided between thinking about how to improve and design the Lunar Way banking backend of the future and actually implementing it. Currently, most of this implementation is done in Go, but before joining Lunar Way Thomas has implemented complex distributed systems using FP in Scala and the Akka actor framework. 

In his free time he spends some of his time trying to teach kids to code.

The Lunar Way Journey from events to event sourcing

Session

Video - Slides

Lunar Way is an app providing banking services and finance management to personal users and small enterprises. Built on top of an existing bank and various integration partners Lunar Way strives to provide its users with a best-in-class service combining traditional banking with the innovation of a fintech startup.

Lunar Way's initial backend was a monolith, but back in 2017 we began building a microservice architecture with asynchronous message passing as the primary communication pattern. Currently, we run 60+ microservices deployed in a Kubernetes cluster on AWS. On the business side, the company is currently going through a development which in the future will demand a lot more from the backend platform.

Hence, we’re in the process of improving the backend architecture to support the growing demands of the Lunar Way of the future. This includes strengthening the guarantees of the platform in relation to message delivery and consistency.

In this talk Emil and Thomas will share this experience - outlining the challenges encountered in the original event-driven platform and the solutions introduced to solve these challenges.

Key takeaways

  • Understand the challenges posed by an event driven micro service architecture
  • Identify the defining characteristics of a microservice architecture that lets you sleep well at night
  • Understand why Event Sourcing is a good service design pattern to provide the basis of these characteristics
  • Get an idea of pitfalls and possible implementations when introducing Event Sourcing into a microservice architecture
  • Learn how to introduce Event Sourced parts into an existing microservice architecture without big bang migrations

EmilKrog Ingerslev

Lunar Way

Architect and Site Reliability Engineer at Lunar Way

Emil is an architect and site reliability engineer at Lunar Way. His focus is on iterating and improving the daily work of developers to make it more efficient and fun. He works with automating stuff like improving CI/CD, setting up kubernetes operators, investigating and improving the platform with e.g. tracing, better protocols, event sourcing patterns, and more. 

Prior to Lunar Way, Emil has worked with a wide range of technologies like React web apps, event sourced backends in Elixir, brown field .NET applications, built systems with PowerShell and TeamCity and much more.

In his free time he enjoys automating everything in his home. 

The Lunar Way Journey from events to event sourcing

Session

Video - Slides

Lunar Way is an app providing banking services and finance management to personal users and small enterprises. Built on top of an existing bank and various integration partners Lunar Way strives to provide its users with a best-in-class service combining traditional banking with the innovation of a fintech startup.

Lunar Way's initial backend was a monolith, but back in 2017 we began building a microservice architecture with asynchronous message passing as the primary communication pattern. Currently, we run 60+ microservices deployed in a Kubernetes cluster on AWS. On the business side, the company is currently going through a development which in the future will demand a lot more from the backend platform.

Hence, we’re in the process of improving the backend architecture to support the growing demands of the Lunar Way of the future. This includes strengthening the guarantees of the platform in relation to message delivery and consistency.

In this talk Emil and Thomas will share this experience - outlining the challenges encountered in the original event-driven platform and the solutions introduced to solve these challenges.

Key takeaways

  • Understand the challenges posed by an event driven micro service architecture
  • Identify the defining characteristics of a microservice architecture that lets you sleep well at night
  • Understand why Event Sourcing is a good service design pattern to provide the basis of these characteristics
  • Get an idea of pitfalls and possible implementations when introducing Event Sourcing into a microservice architecture
  • Learn how to introduce Event Sourced parts into an existing microservice architecture without big bang migrations

ChrisRichardson

microservices.io

Chris Richardson is a developer and architect. He is a Java Champion, a JavaOne rock star and the author of POJOs in Action, which describes how to build enterprise Java applications with frameworks such as Spring and Hibernate.

Chris was also the founder of the original CloudFoundry.com, an early Java PaaS for Amazon EC2. Today, he is a recognized thought leader in microservices and speaks regularly at international conferences. Chris is the creator of Microservices.io, a pattern language for Microservice, and is writing the book Microservice Patterns, which is available as a Manning MEAP. He provides Microservices consulting and training to organizations that are adopting the Microservice architecture and is working on his third startup Eventuate, an application platform for developing Transactional Microservices.

Managing data consistency in a microservice architecture using Sagas

Session

Video - Slides

The services in a microservice architecture must be loosely coupled and so cannot share database tables. What’s more, two-phase commit (aka a distributed transaction) is not a viable option for modern applications. Consequently, a microservices application must use the Saga pattern, which maintains data consistency using a series of local transactions.

In this presentation, you will learn how sagas work and how they differ from traditional transactions. We describe how to use sagas to develop business logic in a microservices application. You will learn effective techniques for orchestrating sagas and how to use messaging for reliability. We will describe the design of a saga framework for Java and show a sample application.

JeppeCramon

Cloud Create

Jeppe Cramon is the founder of Cloud Create where he helps customers build scalable cloud solutions.

What 5 years of implementing microservices has taught me

Session

Video

It's been 5 years since Martin Fowler and James Lewis wrote their article on Microservices and 4 years since Sam Newman released his book on Microserivces. But what have we learned since then?

I've collected the experience and learnings from four different products/projects based on an event centric architecture. What did we learn? In this session we'll get into what worked and what didn't work for these projects. 
What parts worked so well that they survived and were brought forward to the next project and improved?

ShahidIqbal

Independent consultant

Shahid is an independent consultant and Microsoft MVP based in the UK and operating across the globe. 
With over a decade of experience in .NET he works with companies to help migrate their existing applications and processes to the Cloud.

He is a passionate proponent of Cloud Native approaches and employing technologies such as Azure and Kubernetes to solve modern development problems.
Shahid is also frequent speaker at both international conferences and local meetups and is co-organizer of a .NET meetup in the UK.

Solving microservices challenges using Kubernetes

Session

Video - Slides

Developing microservices based applications is a hot trend in our industry. Sometimes this decision is based not on trying solving the specific problems that microservices solve but unfortunately a desire to use the latest techniques or, even worse, a desire to adopt trendy new platforms such as Kubernetes and service meshes. In essence the cart is placed before and horse and application architecture is dictated by platform decisions.

However, let's assume that our audience on the other hand have clearly identified how microservices will benefit them. This talk introduces a "journey" to microservices and highlights some new problems that are created by adopting such an architecture.

We then step through how we can leverage cloud native technologies such as Kubernetes and the even trendier topic of service meshes such as Istio to try and address some of these new problems.

This talk along with demos will cover many topics in an area which is rapidly evolving however we'll try and focus on the fundamental problems, and demonstrate tools that can help make the experience better or simply easier to manage. Topics covered include: Containers Container orchestration - Kubernetes Azure Dev Spaces Service Meshes - Istio

ChristianMikkelsen

Telenor

Opportunities multiply as they are seized and context is king, so I strive to adapt to that every changing world and apply myself to the best of my knowledge.

Result: a serious amount of debates, discussions, implementations, failures and successes at a daily basis.

As a developer, devops engineer and architect I would be nothing if it was not for those daily challenges of the mind, provided by my esteemed mentors and colleagues.

With a background in embedded software, my heart lies the in automation of everything that makes the everyday life of my colleagues hard or trivial and in the everlasting pursuit of the perfect automated infrastructure, pipeline and architecture.

Currently my name is spelled K-U-B-E-R-N-E-T-E-S.

Lightning talk: How a small team survived on microservices

Session

Video - Slides

This lightning talk is a story about how a development team at Telenor in Denmark went through the process of breaking down a monolith into microservices through specification by example. Both as an effort to make it easier to understand and grasp what various parts of the system was doing and documenting it at the same time. This was done by a relatively small team who also had to accommodate the challenges that arise when having a microservice based architecture.

workshops

Microservice architecture essentials

May 13 09:00 - 17:00

Enable the rapid, frequent and safe delivery of software through functional decomposition

Enterprises need to deliver better software faster. It’s no longer sufficient to release quarterly or even monthly. Instead, organizations must use methods, such as DevOps, to frequently deploy changes into production, perhaps as often as multiple times per day. One obstacle, however, to DevOps-style development is that organizations are often mired in monolithic hell. Key business applications are large, complex, unwieldy monoliths, and so it’s impossible to rapidly and safely deploy changes.

 

The solution is to adopt the microservice architecture, which is an architectural style that has the testability and deployability necessary for DevOps. In this 1 day workshop, you will learn about the the microservice architecture, its benefits and drawbacks and how to get started.

 

Unique opportunity to learn from Chris Richardson in Copenhagen at a very affordable price with a Workshop + Conference combo ticket.

 

The workshop takes place at Symbion on Fruebjergvej 3, 2100 København Ø

 

// Register >>
Chris Richardson

Microservice architecture essentials

Enable the rapid, frequent and safe delivery of software through functional decomposition

Enterprises need to deliver better software faster. It’s no longer sufficient to release quarterly or even monthly. Instead, organizations must use methods, such as DevOps, to frequently deploy changes into production, perhaps as often as multiple times per day. One obstacle, however, to DevOps-style development is that organizations are often mired in monolithic hell. Key business applications are large, complex, unwieldy monoliths, and so it’s impossible to rapidly and safely deploy changes.

The solution is to adopt the microservice architecture, which is an architectural style that has the testability and deployability necessary for DevOps. In this 1 day workshop, you will learn about the the microservice architecture, its benefits and drawbacks and how to get started.

Audience: senior developers, architects and technology leaders

The topics covered include:

  • The essential characteristics of the microservice architecture, its benefits and drawbacks and when to use it

  • Decomposition strategies

  • Distributed data management patterns

  • Effective microservice testing strategies

  • Strategies for refactoring a monolithic application to a microservice architecture

Practical Information

The workshop will take place at Symbion on Fruebjergvej 3, 2100 København Ø - The reception can guide you in the right direction of the workshop room, which will also have "Microservice architecture essentials workshop with Chris Richardson" on a sign outside the room.

Parking

You can use the Symbion parking lot free of charge, you just need to register your car with the reception upon arrival.

Public transport

If you are taking the bus then lines 150s (on Lyngbyvej) and 42 (on Lersø Parkalle) both stop close by. The closest train station is Rypark or Emdrup station, which is a 6-7 minute walk from the workshop venue.

Schedule

The workshop starts at 9:00 and we will be there from 8:30 to register all attendees. You don't need to print your ticket - just show us the email with your registration once you've found the workshop room.

Lunch will take place in the Canteen at Symbion at 12:00 and there will be breaks during the day for refulling on coffee/energy.

The style of the workshop is more lecture style then hands-on, so if you want to bring your laptop to take notes that is perfectly fine, but a laptop is not required to follow along.

Chris Richardson

eventuate.io

Chris Richardson is a developer and architect. He is a Java Champion, a JavaOne rock star and the author of POJOs in Action, which describes how to build enterprise Java applications with frameworks such as Spring and Hibernate. Chris was also the founder of the original CloudFoundry.com, an early Java PaaS for Amazon EC2.

Today, he is a recognized thought leader in microservices and speaks regularly at international conferences. Chris is the creator of Microservices.io, a pattern language for microservices, and author of Microservice Patterns. He provides microservices consulting and training to organizations that are adopting the microservice architecture and is working on his third startup Eventuate, an application platform for developing transactional microservices.

Keynote: Flow, Microservices and scale

James Lewis

Strategic Microservice Patterns

Nick Tune

Autonomy & Asynchrony: The key to designing reliable systems

Indu Alagarsamy

Managing data consistency in a microservice architecture using Sagas

Chris Richardson

Airbnb’s Great Migration: Building Services at Scale

Jessica Tai

This is how Microsoft runs Microservices that powers Microsoft's cloud Azure

Mikkel Mørk Hegnhøj

An Event Sourcing Retrospective - The Good, The Bad and the Ugly

Dennis Doomen

Observability and Product Release: Building, Testing, and Shipping Networking Features at DigitalOcean

Sneha Inguva

The Lunar Way Journey from events to event sourcing

Thomas Bøgh Fangel

Micro Frontends - The Nitty Gritty Details or Frontend, Backend, 🌈 Happyend

Michael Geers

Lightning talk: Preparing For a Future Microservices Journey

Susanne Kaiser

Lightning talk: How a small team survived on microservices

Christian Mikkelsen

Has the service mesh killed the fat network client?

Nic Jackson

Solving microservices challenges using Kubernetes

Shahid Iqbal

What 5 years of implementing microservices has taught me

Jeppe Cramon

tickets

buy tickets
DKK 3.900

venue

map

We are a team of 6 people all with a developer background who have been organizing various tech meetups and have been part of a number of conferences as speakers and co-organizers for 5+ years.
We have teamed up in order to spice up the Danish tech scene with quality content around software architecture - this time dedicated to the world of microservices and distributed architecture.

code of conduct

X

Conference Code of Conduct

All attendees, speakers, sponsors and volunteers at our conference are required to agree with the following code of conduct. Organisers will enforce this code throughout the event. We expect cooperation from all participants to help ensure a safe environment for everybody.

Need Help?

You have our contact details in the emails we've sent and our twitter handles above.

The Quick Version

Our conference is dedicated to providing a harassment-free conference experience for everyone, regardless of gender, gender identity and expression, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, ethnicity, religion (or lack thereof), or technology choices. We do not tolerate harassment of conference participants in any form. Sexual language and imagery is not appropriate for any conference venue, including talks, workshops, parties, Twitter and other online media. Conference participants violating these rules may be sanctioned or expelled from the conference without a refund at the discretion of the conference organisers.

The Less Quick Version

Harassment includes offensive verbal comments related to gender, gender identity and expression, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, ethnicity, religion, technology choices, sexual images in public spaces, deliberate intimidation, stalking, following, harassing photography or recording, sustained disruption of talks or other events, inappropriate physical contact, and unwelcome sexual attention.

Participants asked to stop any harassing behavior are expected to comply immediately.

Sponsors are also subject to the anti-harassment policy. In particular, sponsors should not use sexualised images, activities, or other material. Booth staff (including volunteers) should not use sexualised clothing/uniforms/costumes, or otherwise create a sexualised environment.

If a participant engages in harassing behavior, the conference organisers may take any action they deem appropriate, including warning the offender or expulsion from the conference with no refund.

If you are being harassed, notice that someone else is being harassed, or have any other concerns, please contact a member of conference staff immediately. Conference staff can be identified as they'll be wearing branded clothing and/or badges.

Conference staff will be happy to help participants contact hotel/venue security or local law enforcement, provide escorts, or otherwise assist those experiencing harassment to feel safe for the duration of the conference. We value your attendance.

We expect participants to follow these rules at conference and workshop venues and conference-related social events.

BEUPDATED

Sign up for our newsletter to stay updated
as speakers are announced and tickets released.
Follow us on twitter: @MicroCPH