Micro CPH is the first dedicated Microservice conference in Copenhagen, taking place on May 16-17. Join us for inspiring talks about microservices, distributed and event-driven architecture, and get insights into the operational side of running, deploying and testing microservices.

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speakers

Viktor Klang

Lightbend

Rinat Abdullin

Full-stack software engineer

Alon Pe’er

SoundCloud

Gustaf Nilsson Kotte

Jayway

Roger Johansson

Betsson

Liz Rice

Aqua Security

Jeppe Cramon

InPay

Per Ökvist

Tretton37

Greg Young

GetEventStore

Nic Jackson

HashiCorp

Tobias Schmidt

SoundCloud

Alvaro Videla

Distributed Systems Engineer

Martina Iglesias

Spotify

Martin Andersen

Trustpilot

ViktorKlang

Lightbend

Viktor Klang is the Deputy CTO at Lightbend—problem solver, developer, prolific contributor to the Akka project, Akka Tech Lead Emeritus, member of the Reactive Streams Special Interest Group and contributor to the Scala Standard Library concurrency APIs. Known from places such as—but not limited to—the Internet.

The value of Impossible (…and other ideas that I've found immensely useful)

Keynote

Let's face it—most of us in the software industry like solving problems. I'd even go so far as to say that even if we build «things», most of building those «things» is about solving problems. And the reason I say «things», is because most of what we create is virtual—it's technically not even «real». This session is all about the ideas that I've found made the solving of problems easier and quicker—all while solving the right kinds of problems and not the wrong ones, and solving them at the right point in time.

RinatAbdullin

Full-stack software engineer

Rinat Abdullin is a full-stack software engineer doing commercial projects since 2004. He worked on big data analytics for retail, scalable warehouse management as a service, machine learning and workflow automation.

Rinat focuses on designing reliable event-driven systems, helping to deliver them and ensuring that they will survive bad days in production, peak seasons and data-center outages.

He takes personal interest in lean projects, simulation testing, fault injections, DSLs and stack flattening.

He shares his experience in the blog at abdullin.com and occasional BeingTheWorst.com podcast episodes on software craftsmanship.

Emergent event-driven design at SkuVault

Session

As software engineers we want to build software that creates value, scales well and allows us to keep on adding new features. Ideally, at the end of the day, it would also make us proud.

The challenge is in coming up with design that could accomplish all that, while staying simple enough.

At SkuVault we took inspiration from the works of Eric Evans, Greg Young and Alberto Brandolini, event-driven design, CQRS pattern, Lisps and system simulation. We focused on capturing system contracts and behaviors while iterating on the implementation details.

Current solution is event-based, uses C# with Lisp at the backend, supports tenant partitions with 100+ GBs of events and processes them at the speed of 10k per second on a small cloud node.

In this talk we'll go through the history of our design process, learned lessons and tech stack decisions. We'll focus on key ideas and concepts that you could take home and reuse in other projects.

Download Slides

AlonPe’er

SoundCloud

Alon Pe’er joined SoundCloud in 2015 as a Scala software developer. He became part of the Activities & Stream team, where he helps to build and scale social activities services, and usually responds to code reviews with “should probably add a test for that”. On his free time, Alon dances Lindy Hop Swing, and negotiates a peace treaty between his cat and dog.

Move Fast and Consumer Driven Contract Test Things

Session

At SoundCloud, we've found that teams move faster when we've moved away from a monolith architecture to one based around microservices. Unfortunately, this new type of architecture has been prone to cascading failures when breaking changes go unnoticed in one of our services' API's. These failures have had a devastating impact on our system's uptime, but we've found that we can mitigate some of this risk by introducing consumer driven contract tests.

Consumer driven contract tests allow each consumer service and client to define their expectations and interactions with each provider service upstream, and for provider services to verify all of these contracts as part of their build pipeline. Breakage avoided.

In this talk we’ll go through SoundCloud’s process of breaking the monolith into microservices, then see how PACT-based contract tests were introduced, and discuss some of the challenges of adopting such tests in an already-established microservices culture.

Slides

GustafNilsson Kotte

Jayway

Gustaf Nilsson Kotte is a full-stack web developer and architect at Jayway with an interest in design and philosophy.

He wrote his first web page twenty years ago and has been interested in creating things for the web ever since. Except for cheating a bit in Perl in the 90s, his first ""real"" programming language was Haskell, which he is still quite fond of. His professional career started 2008 in .NET with server-side web development. A few years later, he gradually moved over to the client-side, while still returning to server-side rendered web at times. The conclusion: client-side web and server-side web are both valuable, but in different contexts. And the trick is to find out which context you're currently in. He has project experience in ASP.NET MVC, Ruby/Rails, Node/Express, jQuery, Backbone, Knockout, Angular, React and Ember.

Gustaf has spoken on web related topics on several conferences, including RuPy (Budapest), Reject.js (Berlin), jDays (Gothenburg) and JFokus (Stockholm). He has a MSc in Computer Engineering from Chalmers University of Technology, with double specialisation in Software Engineering and Computer Languages.

Microservice Websites

Session

How can we develop websites where the different parts of the pages are developed by different teams? If you work in a large enough organization which has its content and services on the web, this is probably a question you have asked yourself several times.

With this talk I want to show that server-side rendered websites integrated on content (using transclusion) allow for high long-term evolvability compared to client-side rendering integrated with shared code. In other words, if you want a system with high long-term evolvability, you should not develop websites using only client-side JavaScript and integrate them using a shared components approach.

I will also show that Client Side Includes is a good first choice for transclusion technology, since they are lightweight and allow for a faster initial release than Edge Side Includes.

Link to Slides

Microservice Websites on github

RogerJohansson

Betsson

Roger Johansson, Solution Architect at Betsson Group in Stockholm Sweden.

He has a deep passion for open source and have been leading various open source project since the early days of .NET.

Founder of Akka.NET and now focusing on Proto.Actor - A cross platform high performance actor model framework for .NET and Go

Composing Software - Avoiding the distributed monolith

Session

During the last few years, there have been a surge of new tools for building scalable software.
Tools like MS Orleans and Akka all try to solve problems in the area of high throughput and low latency in a distributed environment, and do so very successfuly.
This can however result in a problem known as the "distributed monolith", you are locked in to a specific framework, language or platform, with no exit strategy.

This talk aims to show how to build the same kind of systems, without the language, platform and framework lock in.
Instead focusing on composing software using standard components, embracing the Unix Philosophy.

Thus enabling a higher level of maintainability and business agility.

Slides

LizRice

Aqua Security

Liz Rice is the technology evangelist at container security specialists Aqua Security. Prior to that she was CEO of Microscaling Systems and one of the developers of MicroBadger, the tool for managing container metadata. She has a wealth of software development, team, and product management experience from working on network protocols and distributed systems, and in digital technology sectors such as VOD, music, and VoIP. When not building startups and writing code, Liz loves riding bikes in places with better weather than her native London.

Orchestrator Wars

Session

You’re embracing containers. You’re breaking your architecture into microservices that each look after their own concerns. You want to treat those microservices as “cattle not pets”. You need something to deploy your code across a cluster of machines - and that job falls to an orchestrator.

In this talk we’ll look at what orchestrators are for, and the options that are available. What are the differences between the most popular orchestrators? How do you choose the right solution for your team and your project? Is there a winner emerging in the battle for orchestration hearts and minds?

JeppeCramon

InPay

Jeppe Cramon is Chief Architect for INPAY - Instant Global Bank Payments, where he’s building the next generation of Fintech transaction engines.

Autonomous microservices for a Financial System

Session

There are many articles about microservices, but few cover how to apply Microservice principles to non-trivial domains. In this presentation, Jeppe will show how INPAY design highly autonomous microservices and composite applications. We will get into the underlying principles, such as how to discover service boundaries, how to communicate between services, what role does the UI play.  Finally we will look at how services are implemented and supported by the infrastructure.

Keywords: DDD, Microservices, CQRS, Event Sourcing, Event Driven Architecture, Federated Bus, Composite UI

Slides

PerÖkvist

Tretton37

Per is an enthusiastic developer and architect. Tickled by the challenges of combining smaller details with the greater picture, he is at his essence when working on architecture and web systems.

He is a Consultant at tretton37 in southern Sweden. Currently he’s the Team Lead for the real estate company Hittahem’s Ads team.

Creating stuff on the web introduced him to programming in general. With this enlightenment and he’s knack for the creative, brainstorming ideas ended up in the world of ad agencies later digital agencies. His curiosity in understanding business domains transferred to the world of software - how are the software aiding businesses designed? This sparked his interest in software architecture. Before he knew it, he got into things that he later would learn were in the Domain Driven Design space.

For the last fifteen years, he has worked as a consultant working with full stack .NET development. Today he’s interest is in architecture, cloud and distributed systems.

On a daily basis, he helps clients as a consultant and mentor. He likes to speak, learn and discuss things in our field. He has spoken at conferences like Microsoft Techdays, IDG web days, Microsoft Web Camps and several seminars. Last year he ran the “Microservices book club” at Foo Café.

Practical experiences with Microservices in the Cloud

Session

How can we utilize microservices and tackle the complexity that comes along with distributed systems, using cloud services?

In this session, about experiences with cloud and microservices patterns, we'll explore different microservices styles and approaches.
I’ll tell you how a real estate company, runs Azure PaaS offerings in our venture with microservices. What challenges are we facing, what choices have we made and what services we use to solve the problem?

We'll explore different microservices styles and approaches – “serverless”, gateways, event based integration through unified logs and stream processing. Highlighting the services, we use and our experience and reason about similar offerings from other vendors/platforms.

With this talk I want to show you the options and share some of our experiences with Microservices on Azure.

Slides

GregYoung

GetEventStore

Greg Young is an independent consultant and entrepreneur. He is always involved with many concurrent projects, currently these include building out a distributed event store. For periods of years Greg has been known to stop living anywhere and just travel.

Microservices - A holistic view

Session

A talk by Greg Young

NicJackson

HashiCorp

Nic Jackson is a developer advocate and polyglot programmer working for HashiCorp, and the author of “Building Microservices in Go”  a book which examines the best patterns and practices for building microservices with the Go programming language. In his spare time, Nic coaches and mentors at Coder Dojo, teaches at Women Who Go and GoBridge, speaks and evangelizes good coding practice, process, and technique

Architecting for Reliability with Consul

Session

Distributed applications need a highly available system which handles service discovery, health checking, and simple data storage.  In this talk, we will learn about the functionality that exists in Consul to ensure that your highly available systems stay highly available.  
We will take a deep dive into the gossip protocol managed by Serf and the Raft based consensus protocol, understanding how they enable high availability. We will also look at deployment patterns for your cluster and some of the amazing new features such as autopilot and auto join which allows self-healing.

TobiasSchmidt

SoundCloud

Tobias works for SoundCloud in Berlin. When he is not travelling he is developing platforms, tools, and infrastructure with focus on reliability, latency, scalability, testability, and utilization to ensure further growth of the Platform. Mentoring and educating product development teams in best practices and empower teams to develop, launch, and iterate confidently.

Monitoring microservices with Prometheus

Session

In recent years, many companies have adopted service-oriented architectures by deploying tens to hundreds of small microservices. But with the increasing number of independent services, do you still know what’s going on in your infrastructure?

Traditional monitoring solutions were mostly focused on machines and fell short keeping track of infrastructures where service deployments happen multiple times per day and instances get dynamically allocated on a multitude of nodes. Prometheus is a relatively new monitoring system which has gained a lot of popularity in the last two years as it was explicitly designed for today’s needs of service monitoring and container infrastructure.

In this session, you’ll learn how to instrument a service with a Prometheus client library to provide information about its current health and state. In order to get automatically notified when the service becomes unhealthy, you’ll see how to configure alerts and notifications. Along the way, I’ll discuss a few important key metrics paramount to successfully monitor a microservice.

Slides on SlideShare

AlvaroVidela

Distributed Systems Engineer

Alvaro Videla works as a Distributed Systems Engineer and previously was a Core Developer for RabbitMQ. Before moving to Europe he used to work in Shanghai where he helped building one of Germany biggest dating websites. He co-authored the book "RabbitMQ in Action" for Manning Publishing. Some of his open source projects can be found here: http://github.com/videlalvaro. Apart from code related stuff he likes traveling with his wife, listening/playing music and reading books.

Distributed Systems Theory for Practical Engineers

Session

Distributed Systems are a complex topic. There's abundant research about it but sometimes it is hard for a beginner to know where to start. I would like to outline the main concepts of distributed systems, so the interested person can have a clear path on how to start their own research as well. In this talk I will review the different models: asynchronous vs. synchronous distributed systems; message passing vs shared memory communication; failure detectors and leader election problems; consensus and different kinds of replication.

I will also review a series of books on distributed systems in order to recommend the best one according to the topics we would like to learn about, or the problems we would like to solve. The goal of the talk is to set a good foundation for people interested in learning more about distributed systems.

Talk objectives: When learning about Distributed Systems there are lot of books and papers to chose from, with many of them having titles that are hard to understand. It's difficult then to judge their relevance to our interests if we don't know the topic already. The goal of the talk is to lay a common ground for Distributed Systems so everyone can benefit from the current research on the topic.

Link to slides, transcript and recording of similar talk

MartinaIglesias

Spotify

Martina is a Backend Engineer at Spotify in the infrastructure team that develops tools and frameworks to speed up microservices development. During university she worked as a researcher for the Human Brain Project, which lead to a scientific publication. In her free time she enjoys music and dancing tango.

Automatic discovery of service metadata for systems at scale

Session

Documentation is a painful yet necessary artifact of any software system. In a large microservices environment like Spotify's, where the number of services and teams grows quickly, automation and standardization of documentation is crucial.

However, maintaining any kind of quality documentation at this scale becomes a burden easily: it is a boring task, and an artifact that usually resides in a different place other than your code.

Discover how we solved this issue by including a metadata module in our main microservices framework, Apollo. Allowing automatic discovery of existing endpoints, service configuration, outgoing and incoming calls, and deployment information at runtime. All this information, is visualized in our systems management centralized tool. Making our systems documentation easy to maintain and ensuring we always display up-to-date service metadata.

We want you to know about our open source tool, Apollo and how we solved this common, painful issue with it.

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MartinAndersen

Trustpilot

Martin Andersen is a Director of Engineering with Trustpilot, which he joined back in 2012, after working at two startups since his graduation from DTU since 2004. Originally a backend-oriented developer, Martin occupies himself with scaling, distributed systems, microservices, big-scale databases, serverless and cloud in all shapes and forms.

Scaling your teams using microservices and full ownership

Session

Why are we even focusing on doing microservices? It moves complexity to the network, and requires us to build more robust systems. One answer is scaling. Scaling teams, and scaling systems.

What microservices allows us to do, is to have multi-functional teams with full ownership over different contexts. This minimizes the dependencies across teams, and allows them to work independently. This, in turn, means we can increase the number of teams.

In this talk, I will talk about how we scaled our teams at Trustpilot, first with an API first strategy, but then really speeding it up with a microservice approach. I will also touch on how Trustpilot achieved massive scalable systems, and what full ownership means to us.

Download Slides

Slides on Google Slides

The value of Impossible (…and other ideas that I've found immensely useful)

Viktor Klang

Autonomous microservices for a Financial System

Jeppe Cramon

Scaling your teams using microservices and full ownership

Martin Andersen

Emergent event-driven design at SkuVault

Rinat Abdullin

Microservice Websites

Gustaf Nilsson Kotte

Composing Software - Avoiding the distributed monolith

Roger Johansson

Microservices - A holistic view

Greg Young

Distributed Systems Theory for Practical Engineers

Alvaro Videla

Orchestrator Wars

Liz Rice

Practical experiences with Microservices in the Cloud

Per Ökvist

Automatic discovery of service metadata for systems at scale

Martina Iglesias

Architecting for Reliability with Consul

Nic Jackson

Move Fast and Consumer Driven Contract Test Things

Alon Peer

Monitoring microservices with Prometheus

Tobias Schmidt

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We are a team of 5 people who have been organizing various tech meetups in Copenhagen for the past
3-4 years, and have been part of a number of conferences as speakers and co-organizers.
We have teamed up in order to spice up the Danish tech scene with quality content,
this time dedicated to the world of microservices.