Micro CPH is the dedicated Microservice conference in Copenhagen, taking place on May 14-15 2018. Join us for inspiring talks about microservices, distributed and event-driven architecture, and get insights into the operational side of developing, running, deploying and testing microservices.

Buy tickets
image description image description image description

speakers

Michael Nygard

Vice President, Customer Solutions, for Cognitect Inc.

Mike Amundsen

Director of Architecture, API Academy, CA Technologies

Jonas Bonér

Founder & CTO, Lightbend

Ben Stopford

Data Tech Specialist, Confluent Inc.

Martin Larsen

Software Developer, Queue-it

Stefan Tilkov

Co-founder and Principal Consultant, innoQ

Dmitriy Kubyshkin

Software Engineer, Zalando

Richard Wellum

Independent Software Consultant and Coach

Michael Plöd

Principal Consultant, innoQ

Nicky Wrightson

Tech Lead, Financial Times

William Brander

Software Developer, Particular Software

Thijs Schreijer

Solutions Architect, Kong Inc.

José Carlos Chávez

Software Engineer at Typeform

Ho Ming Li

Lead Solutions Architect at Gremlin

MichaelNygard

Vice President, Customer Solutions, for Cognitect Inc.

Michael Nygard strives to raise the bar and ease the pain for developers around the world. He shares his passion and energy for improvement with everyone he meets, sometimes even with their permission. Living with systems in production taught Michael about the importance of operations and writing production-ready software. Highly-available, highly-scalable commerce systems are his forte.

Michael has written and co-authored several books, including "97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know" and the best seller "Release It!", a book about building software that survives the real world. He is a highly sought speaker who addresses developers, architects, and technology leaders around the world.

Michael is currently Vice President, Customer Solutions, for Cognitect Inc., the company behind Clojure, ClojureScript, Pedestal, and Datomic.

Opening Keynote - Uncoupling

Keynote

We overload our terms a lot in this industry. "Coupling" is one such. That word covers situations ranging from essential to accidental to comical to cosmic. Coupling seems to be the root of all ills. It is the molasses that slows our every move. And yet, in the industry from which we borrowed the term, "coupling" was not a dirty word. It meant something ingenious. Let us contemplate coupling for a time and see what we can do about it.

MikeAmundsen

Director of Architecture, API Academy, CA Technologies

An internationally known author and speaker, Mike Amundsen travels the world consulting and talking about network architecture, Web development, and other subjects. As Director of Architecture for the API Academy, he works with companies to provide insight on how best to capitalize on the opportunities APIs present to both consumers and the enterprise.

Amundsen has authored numerous books and papers. His 2013 collaboration with Leonard Richardson "RESTful Web APIs" and his 2011 book, “Building Hypermedia APIs with HTML5 and Node”, are common references for building adaptable Web applications. He co-authored "Microservice Architecture" (June 2016) and his latest book, "RESTful Web Clients", was published by O'Reilly in February 2017.

Discovering RESTful Web Microservices: A Traveler's Guide

Session

Navigating the landscape of scalable, resilient Microservices can be tricky. While each service fulfills a different purpose, there are a handful of shared properties of microservices. Knowing what these properties are and how to implement them is vital to creating robust components that are available and reliable on demand. The scalability and resilience of the WWW of documents and WebApps gives us some clues on how powerful and reliable Internet-level Microservices can be implemented. And, almost 20 years ago, Roy Fielding documented an approach to meeting the challenge of network-based software; an approach often called RESTful.

Using a mix of story-telling and code examples, this talk identifies key elements of each of these three things -- REST, the Web, and Microservices -- and shows how you can apply these elements to your own projects to gain the flexibility, resiliency, and scalability you need to build the three types of Microservices (Stateless, Persistence, and Aggregator) with the interoperability of the WWW and the adaptability of RESTful network systems.

Whether you are a software architect, developer, or project/product manager, this talk will have something for you.

JonasBonér

Founder & CTO, Lightbend

Jonas Bonér is Founder and CTO of Lightbend, inventor of the Akka project, co-author of the Reactive Manifesto and a Java Champion.

Designing Events-first Microservices

Session

In this talk, we will explore the nature of events, what it means to be event-driven, and how we can unleash the power of events and commands by applying an events-first domain-driven design to microservices-based architectures.

We will start by developing a solid theoretical understanding of how to design systems of event-driven microservices. Then we will discuss the practical tools and techniques you can use to reap the most benefit from that design, as well as, most importantly, what to avoid along the way.

We’ll discuss how an events-first design approach to building microservices can improve the following characteristics over competing techniques

  • increase certainty
  • increase resilience
  • increase scalability
  • increase traceability
  • increase loose coupling
  • reduce risk

Skeptics should definitely attend.

BenStopford

Data Tech Specialist, Confluent Inc.

Ben is an engineer and architect at Confluent Inc (the company behind Apache Kafka) where he’s worked on a range of projects from implementing the latest version of the replication protocol through to developing strategies for streaming applications. Before Confluent Ben built the central data platform for for a large investment bank. His earlier career spanned a variety of projects at Thoughtworks and UK-based enterprise companies. Find out more at http://benstopford.com.

Building Event Driven Services with Apache Kafka and Kafka Streams

Session

Event Driven Services come in many shapes and sizes from tiny functions that dip into an event stream, right through to heavy, stateful services. This talk makes the case for building such services, be they large or small, using a streaming platform. We will walk through a number of patterns for putting these together using a distributed log, the Kafka Streams API and it’s transactional guarantees.

MartinLarsen

Software Developer, Queue-it

Martin is a Software Developer with a primary focus on building scalable cloud applications, with 10 years of experience building web applications on SOA and Microservice architecture. During recent years, he has undertaken one of the leading developer roles in the Danish startup Queue-it, where they have designed and built a highly scalable, fault-tolerant web application on the Amazon Web Services cloud.

Why you should never build Microservices - and why we do it anyway

Session

Jumping all in on Microservices is very appealing for us developers. We dream of the day when all of our systems will be nicely decoupled and independent. When riding the hype we often choose not to talk about the trade-offs, but neglecting to do so can have great consequences, and one day we wake up to reality. Still, there are good reasons why to pursue a Microservice architecture, and at Queue-it that is what we have done. This talk is based on the path towards a Microservice architecture at Queue-it, and will explore the pros and cons of Microservices. We will discuss when to apply the architecture and what alternatives there might be.

StefanTilkov

Co-founder and Principal Consultant, innoQ

Stefan Tilkov is a co-founder and principal consultant at innoQ, a technology consulting company with offices in Germany and Switzerland. He has been involved in the design of large-scale, distributed systems for more than two decades, using a variety of technologies and tools. He has authored numerous articles and a book (“REST und HTTP”, German), and is a frequent speaker at conferences around the world.

Microservices Patterns and Anti-patterns

Session

A look at some of the good and bad things about Microservices and their application

DmitriyKubyshkin

Software Engineer, Zalando

Dmitriy is a foodie and a software architect. If you find him staring into the distance with a joyful face, there is probably a plate of something really delicious standing in front of him. Although you are as likely to see that look, when he is sitting at his desk, working on some tricky frontend infrastructure.

For the past several years Dmitriy has been working at Zalando SE making sure that a large number of teams could contribute to the frontend without blocking each other.

Mosaic Micro Frontends in Review

Session

As companies are adopting microservice architecture to allow teams to move faster and more independently on the backend, it is only natural that there is a desire to get the benefits of this approach in the browser.

Zalando started a journey towards micro frontends almost 3 years ago with a large chunk of both internal and external services now adopting this approach. To power this transformation we have developed a set of services known together as Mosaic.

During the transition, some of the things we tried worked really well, some did not. This talk provides an overview of the learnings and gives a glimpse on the next iteration of the micro frontends in Zalando as well as web technologies that can help us in the future.

RichardWellum

Independent Software Consultant and Coach

Richard is a software developer/tech lead/architect who's spent the last few years specialising in microservice systems in .Net for companies big and small, currently working with a team in Copenhagen on their journey from monolith to services. He was worked on AAA games for Microsoft, on minimum viable products for startups, and everything between, bringing a focus on pragmatism and the pursuit of continuous improvement. He is passionate about engineering and solving real problems, over code and complexity for the sake of it, and about finding new and better ways to collaborate and succeed together a team. Richard blogs at http://richardwellum.com, and is releasing a course on Microservices Patterns, Practices and Pitfalls in early 2018.

Designing Messages - Patterns and Pitfalls

Session

When we design and build an ecosystem of Microservices, the communication between them is a vital part. We'll look at the main message types at our disposal, and how designing our messages with Commands, Events and Queries will control both our interaction with other services, and their interactions with us. We'll go through the often overlooked theory behind the message types, focusing on the semantics of each one, how, and when to use it for best results.

Some of the biggest problems I've seen in helping teams build Microservices consistently come from the design of how the services communicate. The issues can seem subtle at first, but become crippling at scale - the first example I was exposed to caused a flood of deadlocks and timeouts as soon as it was turned on in the wild! Over the years, I've collected some of the causes of these problems which I'll share, with tips on how to avoid similar problems and stay on the happy path.

MichaelPlöd

Principal Consultant, innoQ

Michael works a a Principal Consultant for innoQ. He has over 10 years of practical consulting experience in software development and -architecture. His main areas of interest are currently Domain-Driven Design, Software Architecture, Microservices, Polyglot Persistence and presentation techniques for developers and architects.

Microservices love Domain Driven Design

Session

Without any doubt Eric Evans’ book “Domain Driven Design” is being considered as a “must have read” among many IT specialists from various domains. With the emergence of Microservices, Domain Driven Design has become more relevant than ever.

This talk explains how the patterns and concepts of Domain Driven Design relate to Microservice architectures. We will see that Microservices are not only about Bounded Contexts and that there is much more to Domain Driven Design than Entities and Aggregates. In addition to that I will show how Domain Driven Design will help you to structure and model your Microservices in terms of granularity, business context and interface design (just to name a few). Finally, we will look into migrating existing monolithic applications with the help of patterns laid out in DDD.

NickyWrightson

Tech Lead, Financial Times

Nicky has been working as a developer and leading teams for more than 15 years, across a wide range of industries: travel, banking, media and telecommunications.

Since joining the Financial Times three years ago, she has been heavily involved with the journey through various technologies and approaches: starting with a migration to microservices and then migrating those microservices into containers and the adoption of Go, and most recently moving from a hand-rolled container orchestration and deployment platform to Kubernetes.

She loves to learn new technologies and over the last couple of years that has included Go, Graph datastores, containerisation. She exploits this keen interest in new technologies to provide more capabilities in less time with a reduced operational overhead.

Financial Times' journey to container based microservices

Session

How we run our applications is always evolving - Monoliths to microservices, migration to the cloud, containerisation, improved orchestration. Containers have become synonymous with microservices but they present a new set of challenges...

In this talk I will share some of our experiences and rationale behind early adoption of containerisation using an in-house written orchestration mechanism through to migrating to Kubernetes.

In this talk I will discuss:

  • Our motivation for moving services into containers
  • The pain that went along with very early adoption
  • Which development approaches and practices help or hinder containerising a service
  • How our development process changed when we started running in containers
  • Best practices and lessons learnt around migrations
  • 3 years on: what do we get out of containers now and was the journey worth it?

WilliamBrander

Software Developer, Particular Software

A professional geek, William works for Particular Software writing amazing software like NServiceBus. Passionate about the web and security, he is engaged in a sordid love affair with JavaScript, and spends most of his free time trying to convince others of it's beauty and elegance.

When not behind his laptop hacking away, this amateur beer enthusiast can often be found playing boardgames or drinking cold-brew coffee.

Techniques for monitoring Microservices

Session

Monitoring doesn’t work the same once a system becomes distributed. The types of things that are important to monitor changes as well as “how” you monitor those metrics. This talk expands on the differences and covers ways of bringing the monitoring of a distributed system back under control.

Microservices are a great way to design your system so that it can scale. But once those pieces are in production, how do you know if all the different pieces are working properly? Come join William as he shows you some tools and techniques to monitor lots of pieces all at once.

ThijsSchreijer

Solutions Architect, Kong Inc.

Thijs Schreijer has been working in IT for almost 25 years. He had many different roles from management consultant to service manager to software engineer, in just as many disciplines, infrastructure, outsourcing, testing and software development. He joined the startup Kong Inc in 2015 and is currently holding the position of Solutions Architect in the Office of the CTO at Kong Inc where he helps clients in making the transition to microservices.

API Gateway

Session

In this talk we'll explore API gateways, common gateway patterns, and looking forward to the Service Mesh pattern

José CarlosChávez

Software Engineer at Typeform

José Carlos Chávez is a Software Engineer at Typeform and a Mathematics student at the Universitat de Barcelona. He enjoys working with APIs and distributed tracing, and is the author of the official OpenTracing API library and Zipkin instrumentation for Golang and PHP. While not working with code, you can find him sipping on craft beers.

Distributed Tracing

Session

Understanding system failures traditionally starts with looking at a single component in isolation. However, this approach does not provide sufficient information with distributed services architectures. In these systems, end-user requests traverse dozens of components, and therefore a new approach is needed. In this talk we’ll look at distributed tracing, which summarizes and contextualizes all sides of the story into a well-scoped and causal timeline. We’ll also look at distributed tracing tools, like Zipkin, which highlight the relationship between components, from the very top of the stack to the deepest aspects of the system.

Ho MingLi

Lead Solutions Architect at Gremlin

Ho Ming Li is the Lead Solutions Architect at Gremlin. Prior to joining Gremlin, he worked at Amazon Web Services with many customers providing guidance around architectural and operational best practices. He takes a strategic approach to deliver holistic solutions, often diving into the intersection of people, process, business, and technology. His goal is to enable everyone to build more resilient software by means of Chaos Engineering practices.

Definitive Guide to GameDays - Road to Resilient Services

Session

GameDay is a dedicated time to intentionally create failure scenarios in a safe environment. Regularly running GameDays is an effective Chaos Engineering practice to test the resiliency of your services; to validate the technical intricacies, and to also surface conversations around observability and incident management. GameDays can also expose you to blind spots when systems are operating under suboptimal conditions. In this talk, Ho Ming will be sharing what it takes to run successful GameDays. He will also share some actual findings from past GameDays.

workshops

RESTful Web Microservices Two-Day Workshop

May 16-17 9.00 - 17.00

with examples in C# and NodeJs

In this two-day hands-on workshop, attendees will learn to design, build, and deploy stand-alone microservices that can easily interoperate with other microservices in a Web-based ecosystem.

Attendees will learn:

  • What is a RESTful microservice?
  • Selecting your microservices cloud platform
  • Microservice design patterns
  • The three kinds of microservice models and when to use them
  • How to implement interoperable microservices
  • How to create microservices that can "find-and-bind" at runtime
  • The three pillars of governance for RESTful microservices

Through a mix of lectures and hands-on assignments, attendees will work through the full lifecycle of microservice design, implementation, and deployment. All services built and used within the workshop will be available via public internet and hosted on well-known platforms. At the end of the workshop attendees will have fully-implemented, running RESTful microservices ready to use in production systems.

If you're looking for a hands-on, intensive deep dive into working microservices, this is the workshop for you.

// Register >>
Mike Amundsen

SOA Done Right Two-Day Workshop

May 16-17 9.00 - 17.00

with examples in ASP.Net MVC and NServiceBus

Go beyond the hype and build a solid foundation of theory and practice with this workshop on SOA development.

Join Adam Ralph and Daniel Marbach for a two-day deep dive covering architectural topics like:

  • UI decomposition
  • Data ownership across the enterprise
  • How to choose NoSQL databases for your services

You’ll also learn the nitty-gritty details of building production-ready systems including:

  • Fault tolerance – HTTP and queues
  • Reliable integration with 3rd party systems
  • Scalability, high availability & monitoring

Finally, get some hands-on experience in SOA development by building:

  • Scalable command-processing endpoints
  • Publish/subscribe event-processing interactions
  • Long-running multi-stage business processes and policies

 

 

// Register >>
Adam Ralph
Daniel Marbach

RESTful Web Microservices Two-Day Workshop

with examples in C# and NodeJs

Agenda

We've got a lot to accomplish in a short amount of time. Exact details for each workshop will vary, but below are the key goals for each of the two days in the workshop. A more detailed view of the day will be shared close to the class date.

Day One: Laying the Groundwork

  • REST, Microservices, and the WWW
    • Similarities, Differences, and why that matters
  • Microservice Design Patterns
    • Using the Sketch, Prototype, and Build model for services
  • Choosing Your Hosting Platform
    • Compare/Contrast Heroku and Azure platforms
  • Building a Stateless Microservice
    • The simplest microservice that will actually work
  • Deployment Strategies
    • Git, scripts, pipelines, containers, and more

Day Two: Building the System

  • Versioning, Interop, and Microservice Modeling
    • Leveraging the Three Pillars of Governance
  • Building a Persistence Microservice
    • The data has to go somewhere
  • A Template for Healthy Microservices
    • Supporting monitoring, status-checks, and more
  • Building an Aggregation Microservice
    • Pulling it all together to get something done
  • A World of Discovery
    • Implementing scalable "find-and-bind" discovery at runtime

NOTE: For this course, all service examples will be shown in both C# and NodeJS. Deployments will be done using the commandline to Azure and Heroku hosting platforms.

Prerequisites

Since the workshop is fast-paced and focused on hands-on assignments, attendees need to some ready and able to work. Below are some prerequisites, references, and reminders to help you prepare for a jam-packed two-days of creating microservice for the World Wide Web.

Come Ready to Work

We will be writing, coding, and collaborating all day. You should come ready to work with a laptop loaded with all the tools that you love to work with. Such as:

  • Fully-charged laptop w/ WiFi connection
  • Your favorite code editing platform
  • Local testing tools
  • Git installed and github account activated
  • A working "pipeline" that fits your favorite deployment environment (Heroku, Google Cloud, Azure, AWS/Lambda, etc.)
  • Pens, pencils, note paper. Anything you need to collaborate "offline" w/ a team
  • Anything else you need to be productive and enjoy the two-day workshop

Your Deployment Environment

All attendees will be expected to code, test, build, and deploy their assignments to the "public cloud." You should have experience doing this before joining the workshop. Two platform/process models will be illustrated throughtout the course: C# on Azure and NodeJS on Heroku. However, you can use any database, libraries/SDKs, etc. The only requirement is that all deployed services be reachable over HTTP from a public URL.

You can find basic introductions to deploying services to the cloud on popular platforms here:

Some Reminders

"You will get wet on this ride!"

This will be a fast-paced, hands-on workshop. Attendees should already be comfortable with writing server-side code, building, and deploying components into production. Everyone should come ready to build real services on day one.

"Everyone is welcome here."

While all the examples will be given in C# and NodeJS, all platforms and languages are welcome. Services will be connected over HTTP so the internal code doesn't matter. Whether you are experienced in C#, Java, NodeJS, PHP, etc. you will be able to fully participate in all the assignments.

"The platform is the World Wide Web."

All the example services will built in NodeJS and deployed using simple github release to the heroku hosted platform. The details of your preferred platform, libraries, and build environment are not important. While there will be in-class support Heroku and Azure platforms attendees can use whatever tools and technologies they are comfortable with. If you can deploy to the WWW, you're a winner.

Mike Amundsen

Director of Architecture, API Academy, CA Technologies

An internationally known author and speaker, Mike Amundsen travels the world consulting and talking about network architecture, Web development, and other subjects. As Director of Architecture for the API Academy, he works with companies to provide insight on how best to capitalize on the opportunities APIs present to both consumers and the enterprise.

Amundsen has authored numerous books and papers. His 2013 collaboration with Leonard Richardson "RESTful Web APIs" and his 2011 book, “Building Hypermedia APIs with HTML5 and Node”, are common references for building adaptable Web applications. He co-authored "Microservice Architecture" (June 2016) and his latest book, "RESTful Web Clients", was published by O'Reilly in February 2017.

SOA Done Right Two-Day Workshop

with examples in ASP.Net MVC and NServiceBus

Go beyond the hype and build a solid foundation of theory and practice with this workshop on SOA development.

Join Adam Ralph and Daniel Marbach for a two-day deep dive covering architectural topics like:

  • UI decomposition
  • Data ownership across the enterprise
  • How to choose NoSQL databases for your services

You’ll also learn the nitty-gritty details of building production-ready systems including:

  • Fault tolerance – HTTP and queues
  • Reliable integration with 3rd party systems
  • Scalability, high availability & monitoring

Finally, get some hands-on experience in SOA development by building:

  • Scalable command-processing endpoints
  • Publish/subscribe event-processing interactions
  • Long-running multi-stage business processes and policies

 

Objectives

We’ll understand service oriented architecture concepts, and DDD concepts such as bounded contexts and data ownership.

We’ll apply those concepts to build a simple, yet fully functional, order management system sample with a service-oriented architecture, using patterns such as command processing, pub/sub and long-running sagas.

Skill Level

Senior developers, tech leads, and architects will benefit most from this workshop.

Computer setup

Participants are requested to bring a Windows laptop with Visual Studio 2017 and to follow the full set up instructions at least one week before the workshop, available at https://github.com/Particular/Workshop/blob/master/README.md

Adam Ralph

Distributed systems guy at Particular Software

Adam is a software developer and an open source advocate with a keen interest in distributed systems design, DDD, CQRS and event sourcing.

He maintains contributes to many open source projects and in 2014 had his 15 minutes of fame when he became the first community member to have a pull request accepted for .NET Core.

Adam currently enjoys working remotely for Particular Software, the makers of NServiceBus. He started writing software for fun and friends in 1983 after his Dad bought him his first computer, an Acorn Electron, and he's been delivering commercial​​software since the mid-'90s.​

Daniel Marbach

Developer, Particular Software

Daniel is a Software Engineer at Particular Software, makers of NServiceBus, and a Microsoft MVP for Integration. He can bend minds and spoons with asynchronous programming and has contributed to many open-source projects. He has spoken at several conferences and user groups about asynchronous programming and quality-driven development.

In his free time, Daniel enjoys weightlifting, dark-roasted coffee, playing with his son and writing more code. At least until midnight when his self-imposed router hack kicks in.

Opening Keynote - Uncoupling

Michael Nygard

Microservices love Domain Driven Design

Michael Ploed

Designing Messages - Patterns and Pitfalls

Richard Wellum

Microservices Patterns and Anti-patterns

Stefan Tilkov

Designing Events-first Microservices

Jones Bonér

Financial Times' journey to container based microservices

Nicky Wrightson

Why you should never build Microservices - and why we do it anyway

Martin Larsen

Discovering RESTful Web Microservices: A Traveler's Guide

Mike Amundsen

Mosaic Micro Frontends in Review

Dmitriy Kubyshkin

Building Event Driven Services with Apache Kafka and Kafka Streams

Ben Stopford

Definitive Guide to GameDays - Road to Resilient Services

Ho Ming Li

API Gateway

Thijs Schreijer

Distributed Tracing

José Carlos Chávez

Techniques for monitoring Microservices

William Brander

tickets

buy tickets
DKK 3.900

venue

map

We are a team of 5 people who have been organizing various tech meetups in Copenhagen for the past
6 years, and have been part of a number of conferences as speakers and co-organizers.
We have teamed up in order to spice up the Danish tech scene with quality content,
this time dedicated to the world of microservices.

code of conduct

X

Conference Code of Conduct

All attendees, speakers, sponsors and volunteers at our conference are required to agree with the following code of conduct. Organisers will enforce this code throughout the event. We expect cooperation from all participants to help ensure a safe environment for everybody.

Need Help?

You have our contact details in the emails we've sent and our twitter handles above.

The Quick Version

Our conference is dedicated to providing a harassment-free conference experience for everyone, regardless of gender, gender identity and expression, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, ethnicity, religion (or lack thereof), or technology choices. We do not tolerate harassment of conference participants in any form. Sexual language and imagery is not appropriate for any conference venue, including talks, workshops, parties, Twitter and other online media. Conference participants violating these rules may be sanctioned or expelled from the conference without a refund at the discretion of the conference organisers.

The Less Quick Version

Harassment includes offensive verbal comments related to gender, gender identity and expression, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, ethnicity, religion, technology choices, sexual images in public spaces, deliberate intimidation, stalking, following, harassing photography or recording, sustained disruption of talks or other events, inappropriate physical contact, and unwelcome sexual attention.

Participants asked to stop any harassing behavior are expected to comply immediately.

Sponsors are also subject to the anti-harassment policy. In particular, sponsors should not use sexualised images, activities, or other material. Booth staff (including volunteers) should not use sexualised clothing/uniforms/costumes, or otherwise create a sexualised environment.

If a participant engages in harassing behavior, the conference organisers may take any action they deem appropriate, including warning the offender or expulsion from the conference with no refund.

If you are being harassed, notice that someone else is being harassed, or have any other concerns, please contact a member of conference staff immediately. Conference staff can be identified as they'll be wearing branded clothing and/or badges.

Conference staff will be happy to help participants contact hotel/venue security or local law enforcement, provide escorts, or otherwise assist those experiencing harassment to feel safe for the duration of the conference. We value your attendance.

We expect participants to follow these rules at conference and workshop venues and conference-related social events.